Pakistani Culture Discussed By Patrica

Pakistani Culture Discussed By Patrica
Pakistani Culture Discussed By Patrica

Introduction Of Patrica The Storyteller

Hi, my name is Patricia Stoddard and I’m talking to you today about the Rally quilts of Pakistan and India for me the Mural’s have been a quest it’s something that I kind of happened upon a few years ago I was living in Pakistan with my husband he had the opportunity to behave a military assignment in Pakistan and when we got to Pakistan.

The Rally quilts of Pakistan and India

We were in a large undercoated house and I had several weeks of just plain white walls and being a person who loves collar I went out to the market place and to some handicraft stores to find something beautiful to put on the wall and what I found when I started looking through the textiles is that there is wonderful variety of Tex tiles in Pakistan and later on I found out in India but I had I spent a few hours going through a huge stack of textiles to find the perfect thing for my house and it turned out that at the bottom of the stack was a quilt and being a quilt lover I recognized it immediately as something special and I had just come from the the eastern portion of the United States that the Amish area where I had seen lots of Amish quilts so I saw this quilt that was made in geometric patterns and solid colors as something kind of familiar to me and I just loved it and I bought it toolkit home and and enjoyed it around the house now a week went by and we were still waiting for our things to arrive from the states to decorate our house with and they hadn’t they hadn’t arrived yet and so I went to another handicraft store and this time-hi, my name is Patricia Stoddard and I’m talking to you today about the Rally quilts of Pakistan and India for me the Murasaki’s have been a quest it’s something that I kind of happened upon a few years ago I was living in Pakistan with my husband he had the opportunity to be have a military assignment in Pakistan and when we got to Pakistan.

I found my second quilt now these quilts were they were the only ones in each of these respective stores and they were kind of hidden on the bottom of stacks but I found the secondhand I thought oh my goodness this one is wonderful too again it’s geometric is striking and it has a wonderful border on it and so bought it took it home and another week went by and our thing still hadn’t arrived and so you’re probably guessing the end of the story I went back again found another wonderful coil and by that time I was hooked I was really really curious about this tradition of quilting especially since I had never heard it mentioned so Is-tarted asking questions and the the shop owners could tell me a few thing sand one of them was that it was mainly these quilts were mainly made by the women of the desert region in southern Pakistan so I found out that it was the province of Singh which is the south east corner of Pakistan which includes the huge city of Karachi plus the Senate the Indus River plus a large desert area and these quilts were made from recycled cloth they were made from hand dyed cloth in many instances and they were there.

They were an item that every-family has I also found as I started you now had my eyes tuned to looking for these quilts where when I went out that there were some that had a different-look and so I I got some of those too but then I found out later that thresher originally the bright colors that I’d seen in the first two but the local-merchants had dyed them to brown or blue or red because they thought ecotourists might like those better having fewer colors in them and after I found-that out I asked them please don’t dye them until I take a look at them causerie love the bright colors a bit they originally were and then soon after Hatti met a woman who was from the area and she told me that she wanted to show me a few things and these were Raleigh’s.

Different kinds of challis

So I found out that these quilts were calligraphists these were always that she had this is one for her wedding and it enormous glass mirrors on an enormous leaning inch and a half in diameter covered with sequins covered with mirrors and twas used as a decoration piece in her wedding and it was beautiful and it differentiate it was so different from the others I still my curiosity grew and grew as I kept seeing these different kinds of challis and this was also when-my friend showed me this one was a gift to her at her wedding so I could seethe the tradition of these kind of quilts went from simple geometric to-very very detailed appliqu├ęd and mirrored in embellished quilts as you can see from this one it has 28 identical blocks in it and these blockader made from very fine fine lined applique some of the applicants being only 1/8 of an inch wide and also on this one lots of mirrors lots of border sand the borders were all varied designs and colors and around the edge of thirteenth quilt are silk tassels with beads.

I kept my eyeopener

so this one definitely was one of the-very finest and highest quality of Raleigh’s and then as I kept my eyeopener I sort of it was on my radar now to look for these quilts I discovered leatherette was strong cultural meaning to the Rally quilts this man for example is wearing a patched hat and patchwork is one of the major designs of Raleigh’s-because Cosh cap means something it meant that because he didn’t have prefabrication for a hat that was whole and complete the little patches indicates poverty and he was a beggar and so he would go around and the symbolism thereof patched hat was that he was a person without much and that he was harmless-and he was just looking for help if anyone wanted to help him but he wouldst hurt them and so if you can see from the his picture and also from the quilting is next to it that is also a symbol not having much it’s a humble little.

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